Wondrium Pilots: The Haitian Revolution

Hear how Haiti became the first slavery-free nation of the Western hemisphere.

Wondrium Pilots: The Haitian Revolution is rated 3.8 out of 5 by 58.
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Rated 3 out of 5 by from Confusing I thought the lecture moved too quickly. Since there were so many French names and references (a language I do not speak), it would have been helpful to leave pictures of the gentlemen and maps with the areas on screen when referred to during the lecture.
Date published: 2021-07-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from More please Great overview of a fascinating topic. Please turn this into a full-length course.
Date published: 2021-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I want to know more. This course should be extend to at least 12 to 24 episodes. There is so much to cover and so important to understand the history. The presenter did a great job.
Date published: 2021-07-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Incredibly important history. Great material. I hope that this pilot is turned into a course. The material is fascinating and needs to be more well-known. The history of Haiti's independence, the French Revolution, American independence, imperialism, and the history of slavery and emancipation are all interwoven into the course material in ways that provide important insight into many aspects of current events and the struggles for democracy and equality. I was especially intrigued by the way that free people of color and enslaved people were at times united and at times were turned against each other in service of those in power. I have to agree with some other reviewers that the lecture was a bit overwhelming and at it was hard to keep track of what was happening at times. These problems could be resolved in the framework of a course.
Date published: 2021-07-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intriguing subject with an animated instructor. I thoroughly was intrigued with the subject matter and how it was presented. The instructor immediately gained my interest so I wanted to know what came next. The timeline illustration kept me connected to the material, events and people involved so I could follow along. I was really interested in this course and would like to see the rest of the story. Previous to this course I had no knowledge of these events and kept correlating it to our American Revolution events. It was really eye opening.
Date published: 2021-07-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Yes! Please go ahead with this course I'm very interested in this part of History, mainly because it's not taught in school and it feels wrong. I got lost in the pilot with all the names and places, but I'm guessing a longer series will help with that. Thanks.
Date published: 2021-07-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great course - please go ahead with this one!! This largely echoes other reviews. First, and most important: please go ahead and offer this course. The Haitian revolution is extremely important to world history, both in wider significance as a whole and in details…. but is almost completely unknown in the U.S. (I only recently learned about it through Mike Duncan’s excellent “Revolutions” podcast.). This professor is obviously very knowledgeable, perhaps one of the most knowledgeable historians on the subject. So the proposed course is very worthwhile! There are two problems with the 30-minute presentation, easily correctable. First, the lecturer speaks much to fast, making it hard to follow and keep up. Second, too much material and too many names are crammed into the 30 minute lecture. Perhaps the lecture wanted to illustrate the huge volume of material to be included, but it was too much to follow. Perhaps, as a general rule, listeners like me might remember and keep track of two or three names from each lecture - these 30 minutes had at least 15 names that seemed necessary to keep track of events. For example: I would think a first lecture shoul explain carefully why the Haitian revolution was so important to history, it’s impact on the U.S. at the time, and the major “players” - the French plantation and slave owners, the small group of middle-class free Blacks, and the large group of submerged slaves, who appeared throughout. Each of these was mentioned but given 1-2 sentences only! I would urge these to be sketched out in detail in an introductory lecture -you could spend thirty minutes just on this! (Please excuse the detailed suggestion from a mostly ignorant listener, this is just to illustrate the type of slower, broader, less detailed material that might work better for an introductory lecture.) These criticisms and suggestions do not detract from my throng recommendation for this course!
Date published: 2021-07-02
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Speed Read I have a general interest in all history subjects. I had little knowledge of Haiti's history before seeing this presentation. It was difficult to pick up more than a cursory framework of the lecture given the pace set by the presenter. It was though she was speed reading a script. A more in depth series at a more reasonable pace would interest me.
Date published: 2021-07-01
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Overview

Hear how Haiti became the first slavery-free nation of the Western hemisphere.
The Haitian Revolution

01: The Haitian Revolution

Join Marlene L. Daut to hear a story of monumental, historical significance, of a time when an enslaved people—subjected to some of the harshest conditions in the world—rose up to demand their freedom. You will learn how revolutionaries succeeded in defeating one of the most formidable naval powers in the world and how, in their official declaration of independence, the Black leaders declared that slavery was "forever abolished."

30 min