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True Crime: Decoding the Evidence

Delve into some of history’s most notorious unsolved crimes with three experts who will guide you through the evidence and shed new light on old mysteries.
True Crime: Decoding the Evidence is rated 3.9 out of 5 by 8.
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Rated 4 out of 5 by from Excellent content, chintzy format The presenters do an excellent job but the format used by Wondrium (?) makes one feel as if he is watching a cheap thriller on an offbeat cable channel.
Date published: 2022-10-31
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Nothing new I was disappointed with this course. Expecting so much more, it was just an opinion rehash of what we already know about these cases.
Date published: 2022-09-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from It was okay Most of the episodes were interesting in their own way but in one or two I got tired of hearing about how differently we would've done things today. Of course we would.
Date published: 2022-09-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A good companion... I watched (or at least listened to) this course pretty much in one go while crafting, and it proved the perfect companion when you want something produced by trustworthy sources but that isn't too heavy. I hate to call crime "fun", but it was a really enjoyable course that I flew through. It kept me crafting long after my fingers were sore. The lecturers are all engaging, and they worked well together. It felt very seamless. Although I do enjoy true crime, this course definitely made me sit back and think of new angles that I hadn't thought of before. I highly recommend this course- it's an easy and quick course, and is great if you want a course that doesn't require your entire attention.
Date published: 2022-08-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I'm very old, and remember most of these cases. Excellent experts bring cases up-to-date with what is now known. Better than most of the Hollywood movies in recreations and hypotheses and theories of alternate perps.
Date published: 2022-08-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great short course! Another short course conducting with new interview style with multiple professors. I love these courses and hope Wondrium would create more of these interview style courses. Some of the materials are covered in long form courses of these professors, but for an enthusiast who like quick bite these type of courses are great entry points.
Date published: 2022-06-12
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Overview

In True Crime: Decoding the Evidence, a panel of experts walks you through the evidence of nearly a dozen cold cases, including infamous serial killings, Hollywood scandals, deaths caused by everyday substances, a prehistoric murder, and many more. With their combined expertise in history, chemistry, biology, and forensic anthropology, these experts grant you the opportunity to look at these events through the lenses of both history and contemporary science.

About

Elizabeth A. Murray

With nearly 30 years in the field, I guess I was 'forensic' before it was cool! I find forensic science to be a fascinating subject that incorporates law, ethics, psychology, history, and technology, as it aids our global community.

INSTITUTION

Mount St. Joseph University

Dr. Elizabeth A. Murray is a forensic anthropologist and also Professor of Biology at Mount St. Joseph University, where she teaches doctoral-level human gross anatomy and undergraduate-level anatomy and physiology, as well as forensic science. She earned her bachelor's degree in biology from Mount St. Joseph University and her master's degree in anthropology and Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Biology from the University of Cincinnati.

Most of Professor Murray's forensic casework has been in Ohio and Kentucky, where she has participated in hundreds of investigations. She is one of fewer than 100 anthropologists certified as a Diplomate by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. Professor Murray has been honored with the Sears-Roebuck Foundation Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership Award, and she twice earned the Clifford Excellence in Teaching Award. She has served as an instructor for numerous organizations, including the U.S. Department of Justice, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, and the International Association of Coroners & Medical Examiners. Her television appearances include National Geographic's Buried Secrets, Discovery Health's Skeleton Stories, The New Detectives, and Forensic Files. Her book Death: Corpses, Cadavers, and Other Grave Matters was named one of the top ten summer titles for students by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her 2012 book, Forensic Identification: Putting a Name and Face on Death, was selected as one of the outstanding books of 2012 by the prestigious National Science Teacher's Association.

By This Professor

Forensic History: Crimes, Frauds, and Scandals
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Real Crime Scenes: The Evidence Speaks
854
How We Move: The Gross Anatomy of Motion
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True Crime: Decoding the Evidence
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Richard B. Spence

A key theme is that human history, behavior and reality are governed not by what we know but by what we believe.

INSTITUTION

University of Idaho

Richard B. Spence is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho. He holds a PhD in History from the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he also taught as a visiting assistant professor. His research areas include Russian and military history, espionage, occultism, secret societies, anti-Semitism, and true crime. He is the author of several books, including Trust No One: The Secret World of Sidney Reilly and Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult. He has also been a contributor for HISTORY®.

By This Professor

The Real History of Secret Societies
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Crimes of the Century: A Selective History of Infamy
854
The Secret World of Espionage
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True Crime: Decoding the Evidence
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Secrets of the Occult
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Raychelle Burks

What I want to put out is that we can support girls and women in STEM, that there is a place for them here, and that we will make a place for them, not that they have to conform to preconceived notions and stereotypes.

INSTITUTION

American University
Raychelle Burks is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at American University who has also worked in a crime lab. She holds a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Her research team focuses on the development of field-portable colorimetric and luminescent sensor arrays to detect explosives, chemical weapons, drugs, and latent prints.

By This Professor

True Crime: Decoding the Evidence
853
True Crime: Decoding the Evidence

Trailer

Jack the Ripper

01: Jack the Ripper

One of the most infamous serial killer cases in history, the Jack the Ripper murders in London’s East End continue to fascinate professional investigators and enthusiastic amateurs alike. Who was Jack the Ripper? And who were his victims? Why have these murders lived on in our imaginations since 1888? Examine these questions and more.

29 min
The Coldest Cases

02: The Coldest Cases

Here, your experts discuss several cold cases, ranging from prehistoric murder to medieval regicide to identifying casualties of the first World War. Consider the difficulties of examining evidence long after the crime was committed and discover the advantages and limitations of modern forensic science.

28 min
The Black Dahlia

03: The Black Dahlia

In the summer of 1947, a young woman named Elizabeth Short was discovered brutally murdered in a vacant lot. Her case is one of the most famous unsolved murders in America, yet most don’t know her real name. Take a closer look at what we know about the death of the woman known as the Black Dahlia.

25 min
Death in Tinseltown

04: Death in Tinseltown

The death of producer and director William Desmond Taylor helped fuel the mystique surrounding the seedier side of Hollywood success. As you will see, there were many suspects with varying motives but no final answers to the mystery of his death. Are some crimes truly unsolvable?

22 min
Zodiac: A Cult of One

05: Zodiac: A Cult of One

The serial murders committed by the Zodiac Killer in the late 60s and early 70s were defined by the way the killer(s) left intentional puzzles and clues. Despite the evidence, the case remains unsolved—but certainly not for lack of trying. Look at what is known about this case and consider possible theories.

25 min
Weird Weapons

06: Weird Weapons

What happens when creativity is mixed with malice? Sometimes, the result is murder. Examine several instances of crimes committed with dangerous substances and see why solving these cases is especially difficult. And you may be surprised by how common some of these “weapons” are.

22 min
Recovering the Romanovs

07: Recovering the Romanovs

Separating truth from myth is especially difficult when examining the assassination of the Romanov royal family in 1917. There has been decades of speculation and more than a few pretenders claiming to be surviving members of the family. What do we really know about the murders that ended the Romanov dynasty?

27 min
Death in the Old West

08: Death in the Old West

Tales of the Old West are often larger than life and full of improbable adventure, yet a few stories are actually stranger than fiction. Whether it’s the murder of a famous outlaw or the mysterious deaths of a group of prospectors, see why these cases continue to fascinate and confound us over a century later.

28 min