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Wondrium Pilots: Black Americans and the Revolutionary War

Imagine what it would be like to fight for the freedom of your country, when you, yourself, were not free.
Plus Pilots: Black Americans and the Revolutionary War is rated 4.7 out of 5 by 9.
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from PLEASE release a full course for this series! BEAUTIFUL!!!!
Date published: 2024-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good pilot! This is a good pilot as an introduction for African americans fighting in the revolutionary war and their contribution to the large independance movment. I hope we'll see a full course.
Date published: 2024-01-15
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Fake Washington Quote < Three Minutes In 2:10 - Your claim of George Washington's quote "whoever could arm the negro faster" is a misattribution. There's no historical documentation or secondary party verification. The quote is forged from the substance of a letter from George Washington to John Hancock on 9/24/1777. "I am much apprehensive that General Howe will, in pursuance of his plan of drawing us down to the neighbourhood of his shipping, endeavour to raise Negroes on the same terms with the Whites, in order to mix them in his Corps of Invalids, which will occasion infinite mischief and perplexity. This, I have always understood, was a part of their plan, and I hope Congress will consider of the matter in time, and prevent it, by such means as are in their power." In this letter, Washington expresses concern that British General William Howe may attempt to recruit black soldiers for the British army, and suggests that Congress take action to prevent this from happening.
Date published: 2023-05-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Ready for a full series This is a superb overview of a topic not often covered in history courses. I consider my knowledge of the American Revolution as "advanced," yet much of the lecture was eye-opening. The lecture has a good mix of personal stories and the larger picture. It also describes the immense impact of slavery and the shame of this country's "original sin." I hope Wondrium will proceed with a full series on this topic.
Date published: 2023-03-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from wanted more enjoyed the lecture but it left me hanging, why is the lecturer not revealed? continue the course
Date published: 2021-02-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This is a great pilot. Do the whole course! Who is the professor, and where does she teach? You should include that information!
Date published: 2021-02-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent lecture!! The information provided in this course is very important. I am highly interested in learning more on this topic. I loved the instructor, he presentation was excellent. Please post the entire course!
Date published: 2021-01-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent Quality for My Needs Thank you for such a rich and informative essay on Black Patriots in the American Revolution. Information that demonstrates the African-American's participation in and contribution to every historical event of America's growth. Excellent, well delivered, information, some of which was new to me. I will listen to this lecture multiple times. Again, thank you.
Date published: 2021-01-10
  • y_2024, m_4, d_14, h_5
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  • clientName_teachco
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Overview

Learn what inspired Black men-enslaved and free-to take up arms during the American Revolution and become a powerful fighting force.
Wondrium Pilots: Black Americans and the Revolutionary War

01: Wondrium Pilots: Black Americans and the Revolutionary War

Thousands of black men, free and enslaved, served in the military during the American Revolution in hope of emancipation, citizenship, and equality. As a result of the war, see how they formed their ideology for emancipation from slavery based on the principles of freedom, equality, brotherhood, and justice.

36 min