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Doctors: The History of Scientific Medicine Revealed through Biography

Get a fascinating and insightful history of medicine from a renowned surgeon and professor at Yale School of Medicine.
Doctors: The History of Scientific Medicine Revealed Through Biography is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 135.
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fascinating Really interesting course narrated by a cosumate story teller which conveyed the subjects in a Really engaging way. While learning we were entertained which made the subjects even more memorable
Date published: 2024-05-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Delightful series A delightful, short series of biographical sketches that reveal the evolution of medicine from Antiquity to the 20th century. Prof. Nuland is a superb lecturer, always clear, well structured with amusing anecdotes.
Date published: 2023-09-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Course. This the one of their VERY BEST courses. We all loved and enjoyed it. Thanks.
Date published: 2022-10-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intellectually stimulating. Great presenter (teacher/surgeon). Interesting angle to approach medicine through the lens of great doctors.
Date published: 2022-10-26
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Beware Does not have streaming video. Would not have purchased if I had known.
Date published: 2022-02-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great review of medicine's major innovations Rather than being an extensive review of the history of medicine, this course is a brief but entertaining overview of some of the biggest steps forward in modern Western medicine and the people who made them happen. The lecturer is a wonderful, engaging speaker who held my attention through every lecture. The course shows how one innovation or change in thinking led to the next, and how the pace of innovation rapidly increased through time. There aren't many women or people of color represented but, sadly, that's the history of western medicine. Since 11/12 lectures are about events before 1900, this wasn't entirely surprising - but I would happily have listened to another 12 lectures to get more diversity!
Date published: 2021-11-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The People Who Brought Us Modern Medicine I wish there had been more than just twelve of these wonderful lectures. The subject matter is so interesting, and the presentation so engaging that I consider this course one of the finest of the nearly 100 I have purchased from The Teaching Company. Dr. Nuland speaks with the credibility of a well-prepared teacher plus the flair of an entertaining raconteur. Turning points in medical history are studied here through the biographies of key individuals whose theories, research, and medical practice shaped and furthered doctoring during the past twenty-six centuries. The focus is primarily on Western medicine, though references are also included to Asian medicine, to alternative medicine, to how historical events and religion have influenced doctoring, etc. The biographies of the featured doctors reveal many laudable accomplishments; but I also appreciate that Professor Nuland does not shy away from telling us about occasions when even famous innovators turned out to be wrong-headed in their assumptions or fallible in their behaviours. As with other sciences, progress in medicine has not been exclusively led by the unerring. I highly recommend this Great Course; it is a gem that ought not to be missed.
Date published: 2020-06-28
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Sorry, didn't work for me, cannot recommend. These 12 lectures were mildly interesting, full of anecdotes, reminded me of the very old radio show "Art Baker's Note Book". I found the professor's droning style quite flat, bland, dry ~ that didn't help. And I dearly wanted to enjoy this series. No, for me it was fair only.
Date published: 2019-10-14
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Overview

What major discoveries made modern medicine possible? Who were the fascinating individuals responsible for these discoveries? What qualities prepared each of them for their unique roles in medical history? Discover the answers in Doctors: The History of Scientific Medicine Revealed. Here

About

Sherwin B. Nuland

The underlying philosophy of the Hippocratic physicians was that disease involves a patient’s entire body and mind, so therapy must be directed to the whole context of the patient’s life situation rather than a small part of it.

INSTITUTION

Yale School of Medicine

Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland (1930-2014) was Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Yale School of Medicine and Fellow of the university's Institution for Social and Policy Studies. He served on the executive committees of Yale's Whitney Humanities Center and its Interdisciplinary Bioethics Project. Professor Nuland was a graduate of the Bronx High School of Science, New York University, and the Yale School of Medicine, from which he earned his M.D. After training in surgery at the Yale-New Haven Hospital, he practiced and taught there for three decades. He considered the bedside and operative care of over 10,000 patients to be the most rewarding work of his career. He taught bioethics and medical history to undergraduates and medical students. Dr. Nuland is the author of eight books, including Doctors: The Biography of Medicine and The Wisdom of the Body. He is also the author of How We Die, a reflection on the modern way of death, which was on the New York Times best-seller list for 34 weeks. This book won the National Book Award and was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize and the Book Critics Circle Award. Dr. Nuland has written dozens of articles for magazines and periodicals, including The New Yorker, Time, Life, National Geographic, Discover, The New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times.

Hippocrates and the Origins of Western Medicine

01: Hippocrates and the Origins of Western Medicine

Hippocrates's name is given to a new form of healing, setting aside superstition and religion in favor of keen observation, medical ethics, recording, and teaching.

34 min
The Paradox of Galen

02: The Paradox of Galen

Galen based his career on the idea that understanding disease required understanding the body. His influence was so overwhelming it took 1,400 years before his errors in that understanding began to surface.

32 min
Vesalius and the Renaissance of Medicine

03: Vesalius and the Renaissance of Medicine

An extraordinary volume by a Flemish medical student clarifies the understanding of anatomy of function in ways never imagined before.

32 min
Harvey, Discoverer of the Circulation

04: Harvey, Discoverer of the Circulation

Harvey's 1628 description of the heart's function and the continuous circulation of the body's blood supply is generally considered the greatest contribution ever made to the art of healing.

31 min
Morgagni and the Anatomy of Disease

05: Morgagni and the Anatomy of Disease

The Hippocratic thesis that illness originates in an entire person inhibits research, until the work of one man shows that virtually every symptom arises from a specific pathology in a particular structure.

30 min
Hunter, the Surgeon as Scientist

06: Hunter, the Surgeon as Scientist

At a time when surgeons merely amputated, lanced, and bled at the behest of physicians, John Hunter introduces the notion that they can also be researchers, and brings science into surgery.

31 min
Laennec and the Invention of the Stethoscope

07: Laennec and the Invention of the Stethoscope

Driven by his own embarrassment with the necessities of diagnostic procedure, an intensely shy doctor makes a dramatic advance.

31 min
Morton and the Origins of Anesthesia

08: Morton and the Origins of Anesthesia

In the 1840s, nitrous oxide, ether, and chloroform are discovered to have anesthetic properties. The great surge in the possibilities for treatment is accompanied by acrimonious debate among those claiming the credit.

29 min
Virchow and the Cellular Origins of Disease

09: Virchow and the Cellular Origins of Disease

Following the discovery of cells, a German pathologist introduces the concept that disease is caused by pathological change in a previously normal cell. His 1858 book becomes the bible of the new medicine.

30 min
Lister and the Germ Theory

10: Lister and the Germ Theory

An indomitable Quaker physician persists over two decades in his efforts to convince physicians of the causes of postsurgical mortal infection and how to prevent it, revolutionizing medical thinking.

30 min
Halsted and American Medical Education

11: Halsted and American Medical Education

A brilliant young surgeon develops a new paradigm of operating room procedure, transforming surgery and contributing to a new medical school's ascendancy as the model on which all others in the United States would be based.

31 min
Taussig and the Development of Cardiac Surgery

12: Taussig and the Development of Cardiac Surgery

The Johns Hopkins Medical School is founded on the principle that women must be admitted on the same basis as men. One of its greatest female graduates helps establish the new field of pediatric cardiology.

30 min

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