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A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts

Learn how England transformed itself from a medieval backwater into the first modern state in this sweeping course on one of the most interesting periods in history.
A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts is rated 4.8 out of 5 by 187.
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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Thought this course was great! Engrossing course material. Also very instructive. This period of English history has always been a very confusing hodge-podge of people and events for me. This course helps bring everything into much clearer focus, as well as providing some much needed additional information that I was not familiar with. It also provides a much needed backdrop of English history to explain events, and currents of thought, that existed in the United States prior to our revolution and writing of documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.
Date published: 2022-09-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Comprehensive but engaging! I thoroughly enjoyed this course by Dr. Bucholz. This is the second of his Great Courses that I listened to, and I keep marvelling at how engaging he is and his skill at the art of story-telling. This course covers a LOT of ground, but I never felt as though it was rushed. Instead, you get the highlights and major important moments, movements, and members of each era. This can serve as a jumping-off point for further study! If you love English history, give this course a go!
Date published: 2022-07-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this course I took this course months ago and enjoyed it so much, I plan on doing it again.
Date published: 2022-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from GREAT STORYTELLER Professor Bucholz is a great storyteller, as well as an expert in this period of English history. Of over the fifty courses I have purchased from the Teaching Company this one I have enjoyed the most. I highly recommend this course for history enthusiasts.
Date published: 2022-07-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic! Excellent course. Except for a few lectures in the first half that somewhat tediously repeated the somewhat tedious lives of the "everyday" citizen, the rest of the course is outstanding. The Prof. does a great job of explaining why certain aspects are relevant to the modern world and to Americans in particular. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2022-05-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Great Chain of Having ' The Great Chain of Having' Arthur Lovejoy made a great contribution to Intellectual History of Europe with his schematisation of the prevailing social and moral attitudes of the late Mediaeval and Renaissance period in European History but it was retrospective; it sought to explain the universe encapsulated by the feudal and religious dispensation yielded by the transformation of the Roman Empire in late antiquity. The Pirenne Thesis is now disputed in detail but the essential psychological shock of thebarbarian invasions, the rapid growth of Islam, and the depredations of the Vikings was palpable and created an agrarian society needing both defence and subsistence. 'The Great Chain of Being', melded these two social processes into a working perspective of their reality. I remain unpersuaded by Professor Bucholz', emphasis on 'The Great Chain of Being' as the basic criteria of 'Modernisation' and 'Progress' in Tudor and Stuart Britain. He seems to argue that the essential criteria of 'modernity' can be identified by the processes which disrupted and destroyed the feudal and agrarian society. In an otherwise comprehensive course n the development of British Political and Economic Culture; the political culture and social structure and the conditions of life are covered very well and he does well to identify the fluctations of British Political Life incident on the Reformation and the dynastic consequences for Britain of the stresses arising from the gradual decay of feudal society but I feel that by laying 'excessive' emphasis on 'The Great Chain of Being' he tends to distort the salients of English History; the insularity of Britain, its peripheral situation to the great dynastic and religious competition, the natural resources, the progressive conservativism which insularity seems to generate. This is a great course, well delivered, and well designed,and with the above caveat Iwould recommend it, especially his discussion the the political viscissitudes of the later Stuarts, and the importance he attaches to Mary II and Queen Anne, which are seldom so well detailed and considered. His three omissions are I think best explained by an encounter I had with a European journalist and an African politician [alas assassinated] as well as by an irony at the very inception of our system pointed out by another American Historian. 1. A journalist, returning from a stint of service in the UK was asked if there was any event which he found difficult to identify, or explain to his own people [this has now changed by another irony not discussed here]. He said that he came to Britain in the wake of the Brixton Riots, and it was expected that they would recur in a hot summer. The hot summer transpired but not the riots, because, as was explained to him, the West Indian Cricket Team, touring Britain won the test series 5 nil. It soaked up the anger and frustration of the West India Community 2. An African politician discussing the Empire and Commonwealthsaid that it was nt the legions or the politica theorist that made the Empire endure but the Methodist Missionaries, especially the women. 3. The most compelling biography of Richard III was Paul Murray Kendall. He more than any other managed to make a cogent case for his likely innocence and in the bourse of that work he showed that actually the most enlightened parliament for three hundred years ws that convoked by Richard III and more interesting of ll was that Richard owned a Wycliffe Bible and his favourite religious community was the Augustinians and his most important association as Viceroy of the North was the Hanseatic League BaruchX
Date published: 2022-04-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the very best courses I have taken many, many courses from this site. This one is one of the very best. Professor Bucholz is such an outstanding teacher that I forgive him his Oxford affiliation (mine are Cambridge and Harvard). The Great Courses (sorry, Wondrium) have done a great job on the history of England from the beginning to 1714. Thereafter, things become quite bitty, with bits on Victoria, the Industrial Revolution, Churchill, the Beatles, and so on. We need an overarching history from 1714 to, say, 1950 or so. Professor Bucholz would be a great teacher of such a course but, of course, Wondrium would have many contacts and could pick someone else. Anyway, thank you for Professor Bucholz's courses. They merit more than five stars.
Date published: 2022-02-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I only wish I could give it 6 stars This course is simply excellent and the professor is witty, charming very engaging. He gives a lot of facts and dates, but they are NOT delivered in a dull and boring way. The basic history is supplemented with stories, vignettes and personal experiences. This is a wonderful course! However, I would like to give one warning. In the very first episode, the camera person zooms in too close and as the professor sways as he is talking, the camera sways side to side also. I was getting seasick and I almost quit the course. But fortunately the camera work gets better after the first episode and everything is great.
Date published: 2022-02-12
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Overview

Explore the Tudor-Stuart era: a captivating examination of the 229-year period from 1485√1714 during which England transformed itself from a minor feudal state into what has been called the first modern society. In making that transformation, England became the wealthiest and most powerful nation on Earth. Award-winning Professor Robert Bucholz of Loyola University of Chicago presents a sweeping, 48-lecture course on one of the most intriguing times in modern history..

About

Robert Bucholz

This course is much more than a way to pass the time. It is, rather, a toolkit for any citizen of the West, a survival kit for any citizen of the world.

INSTITUTION

Loyola University Chicago

Dr. Robert Bucholz is Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago, where he has taught since 1988. He earned his B.A. in History from Cornell University and his D.Phil. in Modern History from Oxford University. Before joining the faculty at Loyola University, Professor Bucholz taught at numerous universities, including Cornell University; California State University, Long Beach; and Loyola, Marymount University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. Among Professor Bucholz's numerous teaching awards are the Sujack Award for Teaching Excellence, the highest such award presented by the Loyola College of Arts and Sciences. On two occasions, he received the Honors Program Faculty Member of the Year Award. At Loyola University, Professor Bucholz teaches courses on Early Modern London, Early Modern England, and English Social History. He is the author or coauthor of books on English history, including Early Modern England: A Narrative History and The Augustan Court: Queen Anne and the Decline of Court Culture. Professor Bucholz is also the project director of the Database of Court Officers, which contains the career facts of every person who served in the British royal household from the Restoration to the death of Queen Victoria.

By This Professor

A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts
854
Foundations of Western Civilization II: A History of the Modern Western World
854
A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts

Trailer

England 1485-1714, the First Modern Country

01: England 1485-1714, the First Modern Country

A look at the scope of the course, the significance of English history, and why this Early-Modern period was crucial not only to the development of England, but to transatlantic civilization itself.

32 min
The Land and Its People in 1485-I

02: The Land and Its People in 1485-I

This lecture examines England's so-called "island mentality" and its complicated relationship to both Europe and the Celtic lands of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.

30 min
The Land and Its People in 1485-II

03: The Land and Its People in 1485-II

The discussion of the physical world of the English people in 1485 continues with this look at the material and social topography of the English town, manor, and village, from the wealthiest residents to the poorest.

30 min
The Land and Its People in 1485-III

04: The Land and Its People in 1485-III

The focus switches to the mental landscape of the English people, and especially to the concept of the "Great Chain of Being" and the unyielding social hierarchy it implied....

30 min
Medieval Prelude-1377-1455

05: Medieval Prelude-1377-1455

Beginning with the end of the reign of Edward III, the English monarchy and constitution undergoes more than a century of instability prior to the accession of the Tudors. This lecture begins the explanation of why this happened.

30 min
Medieval Prelude-1455-85

06: Medieval Prelude-1455-85

Over a 30-year period, the Lancastrian and Yorkist claimants to the throne fight three different Wars of the Roses and produce a short-lived line of Yorkist kings, including Richard III, whose reign ends in the successful rebellion that begins the Tudor Dynasty.

30 min
Establishing the Tudor Dynasty-1485-97

07: Establishing the Tudor Dynasty-1485-97

This lecture examines the steps taken by Henry VII to secure the crown after his victory over Richard III, the failed Yorkist rebellions that follow, and Henry's subsequent efforts to secure alliances that will deprive future rebels of allies or secure bases.

30 min
Establishing the Tudor Dynasty-1497-1509

08: Establishing the Tudor Dynasty-1497-1509

This lecture examines Henry's efforts to make England's government more efficient, less expensive, and more responsive to his wishes by following three old principles of medieval kingship: the king must be strong, he must govern with consent, and he must live "of his own" (within a budget).

30 min
Young King Hal-1509-27

09: Young King Hal-1509-27

A look at the larger-than-life personality of Henry VIII and the early years of his reign, years dominated by Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, one of the most hated government officials in English history.

30 min
The King's Great Matter-1527-30

10: The King's Great Matter-1527-30

This lecture examines Henry VIII's attempts to secure from the Roman Catholic Church a divorce from his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, and the complex implications that surround it.

30 min
The Break from Rome-1529-36

11: The Break from Rome-1529-36

With the Catholic Church weak and divided at the top, Henry and his new leading minister, Thomas Cromwell, are able to break England's allegiance to the Pope, secure the king's divorce, and initiate the Reformation in England.

30 min
A Tudor Revolution-1536-47

12: A Tudor Revolution-1536-47

An examination of what some historians have seen as a Tudor plan to increase the power and efficiency of the monarchy, not only in religion, but in all areas of English life.

30 min
The Last Years of Henry VIII-1540-47

13: The Last Years of Henry VIII-1540-47

An aging king attempts to avoid invasion by the Catholic powers, balancing the demands of Protestant reformers with his own desire for a traditional Church-under his command-that would retain many Catholic practices....

31 min
Edward VI-1547-53

14: Edward VI-1547-53

Two successive advisors to the boy-king (only nine when he takes the throne) increasingly push the country toward Protestantism, including an attempt to alter the succession. But when Edward dies, the country still rallies to the Catholic heir, Mary Tudor.

30 min
Mary I-1553-58

15: Mary I-1553-58

Failing to realize that her people have rallied to her only because she is the rightful heir and not because she is Catholic, "Bloody Mary" attempts to ally with the Spanish Empire and undo the Reformation-at tremendous human cost.

30 min
Young Elizabeth-1558

16: Young Elizabeth-1558

As Queen, Elizabeth uses her superb political skills to balance off both competing court factions and potential suitors. Rejecting marriage, she cultivates the image of "Gloriana," the Virgin Queen symbolically wed to the people of England.

30 min
The Elizabethan Settlement-1558-68

17: The Elizabethan Settlement-1558-68

Bitter religious divisions are tearing at England as Elizabeth takes the throne. This lecture examines those divisions and how the Scottish Reformation, the rebellion against Mary Queen of Scots, and Mary's flight into Elizabeth's protection place in grave peril not only both women, but also the prospects for peace in the British Isles.

30 min
Set in a Dangerous World-1568-88

18: Set in a Dangerous World-1568-88

Increasing tensions between England and Spain over trade and the Protestant Revolt in the Netherlands mark a period of plots against Elizabeth, the assembling of the Spanish Armada, the execution of Mary Queen of Scots, and the defeat of the Armada by a newly strengthened Royal Navy.

31 min
Heart and Stomach of a Queen-1588-1603

19: Heart and Stomach of a Queen-1588-1603

The beginning of a world war with Spain has a devastating effect on England's economy and makes for a stormy relationship with Parliament. In the end, it is the cult of "Gloriana" that keeps Parliament and the people loyal and allows the smooth succession of the Stuarts to the throne.

30 min
The Land and Its People in 1603

20: The Land and Its People in 1603

The start of an eight-lecture intermission from the political narrative to address the economic and social changes experienced by the English people since 1485-beginning with unprecedented stresses on the Great Chain of Being.

30 min
Private Life-The Elite

21: Private Life-The Elite

An examination of how members of the landed aristocracy (i.e., nobles and gentry) lived their lives circa 1603....

31 min
Private Life-The Commoners

22: Private Life-The Commoners

The same topics dealt with in the previous lecture-education, courtship, marriage and day-to-day living-are dealt with as they are experienced at the other end of the "Chain."

31 min
The Ties that Bound

23: The Ties that Bound

A look at the institutions, habits, and attitudes designed to promote meaning and community in England, including popular religion, paternalism, extended family ties, and the support of one's neighbors.

30 min
Order and Disorder

24: Order and Disorder

Toward the end of the sixteenth century, English men and women are convinced that disorder, poverty, and crime are on the rise. This lecture examines whether they were right and how the system functioned to address these issues.

31 min
Towns, Trade, and Colonization

25: Towns, Trade, and Colonization

England begins its movement out of the countryside-not only into towns, but to fledgling colonies that form an alternative for those who cannot make a go of it in England or conform to its rigid religious and social structure.

31 min
London

26: London

A guided walk through what is, by far, the largest city in the realm, as well as its capital, greatest port, and center of culture and fashion.

31 min
The Elizabethan and Jacobean Age

27: The Elizabethan and Jacobean Age

A look at the tremendous flowering of English culture at the turn into the seventeenth century, including what is possibly the greatest achievement of the age-the development of the English language itself-and the reaction of authorities to this powerful and thus dangerous tool.

30 min
Establishing the Stuart Dynasty-1603-25

28: Establishing the Stuart Dynasty-1603-25

The problems that James I inherits from the Tudors will eventually overwhelm the early Stuart state and produce the British Civil Wars. This lecture introduces five enduring areas of tension-sovereignty, financing the government, war and foreign policy, religion, and local control-with a focus on the first two.

30 min
The Ascendancy of Buckingham-1614-28

29: The Ascendancy of Buckingham-1614-28

A look at the 14-year dominance over English politics and government of George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, who rises to be the principal favorite of both James I and his son, Charles I.

30 min
Religion and Local Control-1628-37

30: Religion and Local Control-1628-37

This lecture examines the impact of the different and problematic religious settlements reached in each of the three kingdoms ruled by the Stuarts: England, Scotland, and Ireland.

30 min
Crisis of the Three Kingdoms-1637-42

31: Crisis of the Three Kingdoms-1637-42

In 1637, Charles I attempts to impose an Anglican liturgy on Presbyterian Scotland, unleashing a chain of crises that ultimately leads to the complete breakdown of understanding between king and Parliament and a resulting declaration of civil war in England.

30 min
The Civil Wars-1642-49

32: The Civil Wars-1642-49

A look at how the wealth controlled by Parliament eventually wears away Charles I's advantage in experienced fighting men and leads to an event unprecedented in English history: the execution of a king on a charge of high treason against the people of England....

30 min
The Search for a Settlement-1649-53

33: The Search for a Settlement-1649-53

This lecture examines the first part of England's 11-year period without a king, including the flowering of a period of relative political, social, and religious freedom, and the conquests of Ireland and Scotland.

30 min
Cromwellian England-1653-60

34: Cromwellian England-1653-60

Parliament and the army ask Cromwell to administer England as Lord Protector of the realm. But after five years of effective rule, Cromwell dies-unleashing a period of instability that leads to the negotiated restoration of the Stuart monarchy.

30 min
The Restoration Settlement-1660-70

35: The Restoration Settlement-1660-70

The restoration settlements in Church and State seem to turn the clock back, with the king dependent on Parliament, the Church of England reestablished and Puritans made outlaws, and defeat at the hands of the Dutch plunging the nation into crisis.

31 min
The Failure of the Restoration-1670-78

36: The Failure of the Restoration-1670-78

Charles II and his new ministry-the Cabal-begin a bold attempt to solve all of his problems by signing the Treaty of Dover with France, England's ancestral enemy.

31 min
The Popish Plot and Exclusion-1678-85

37: The Popish Plot and Exclusion-1678-85

An alleged "Popish plot" to kill the king and establish his Catholic brother, James, Duke of York, on the throne leads to the rise of the Whig and Tory parties, a failed effort to bar James, and the pursuit by Charles of what comes to be known as the Tory Revenge. The Revenge culminates in a deathbed conversion to Catholicism and the peaceful succession of James.

30 min
A Catholic Restoration? 1685-88

38: A Catholic Restoration? 1685-88

A look at the short and unpopular reign of James II and his attempts to restore toleration for Catholics. Unpopular though he is, no one contemplates rebellion, until the surprise birth of a Catholic heir leads seven prominent noblemen to invite invasion by the Protestant William, Prince of Orange....

31 min
The Glorious Revolution-1688-89

39: The Glorious Revolution-1688-89

James flees in the face of William's invasion, and a compromising Parliament declares his abdication, placing William on the throne and marking England's final break with the Great Chain and her entry into the modern world.

31 min
King William's War-1689-92

40: King William's War-1689-92

The necessities of the war with France bring about a fundamental shift in the respective roles of England's two political parties, and irrevocably extend the reach of Parliament's power and role in the constitution.

31 min
King William's War-1692-1702

41: King William's War-1692-1702

An examination of the economic strategy that enabled victory over France; the Act of Settlement that solved England's succession question-at least on paper-and moved the nation closer to constitutional monarchy, and the two royal deaths that brought England to the brink of yet another war with France. It is a war that will have to be fought by a new ruler after a hunting accident claims William's ...

30 min
Queen Anne and the Rage of Party-1702

42: Queen Anne and the Rage of Party-1702

A close look at a Queen greatly underestimated in both her own time and by historians, yet whose strong common sense and identification with her people's hopes and dreams would make her the most successful of the Stuarts.

30 min
Queen Anne's War-1702-10

43: Queen Anne's War-1702-10

The War of the Spanish Succession decides the thrones of Spain and Britain and settles the balance of power in Europe and North America for a generation. But even after a series of major victories, it is the queen's subtle political maneuvering that paves the way for peace.

30 min
Queen Anne's Peace-1710-14

44: Queen Anne's Peace-1710-14

Though the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 ends the war and lays the groundwork for the British Empire and England's commercial and military dominance of Europe for the rest of the century, issues of religion and succession are still in play when Queen Anne's lifelong fragile health finally fails, and the last of the Stuart monarchs dies.

30 min
Hanoverian Epilogue-1714-30

45: Hanoverian Epilogue-1714-30

A look at how the peaceful accession of George I, combined with Britain's victory in the War of the Spanish Succession, solves or pacifies most of the tensions that have wracked England under the Stuarts, and allows Great Britain to become the richest and most powerful country in Europe during the eighteenth century.

30 min
The Land and Its People in 1714-I

46: The Land and Its People in 1714-I

An examination of the social and economic state of the country as the reign of the Stuarts ends.

31 min
The Land and Its People in 1714-II

47: The Land and Its People in 1714-II

As England turns into the eighteenth century, the face of artistic and intellectual life is changing as primary patronage of the arts passes from the Church and court, replaced by noble and popular sponsorship of architecture, literature, music, and painting.

31 min
The Meaning of English History-1485-1714

48: The Meaning of English History-1485-1714

A summary of what twenty-first-century Americans should take from English history under the Tudors and Stuarts: a time when ideas and concepts that still lie at the heart of our notion of democratic civilization were pioneered.

31 min